A few meters of cable could go a long way

“Breakthroughs are often accomplished by combining technological assets with industrial tools on an international scale.”   

   A few meters of cable could go a long way

 
 

A few meters of cable could go a long way

A few meters of cable could go a long way

A few meters of cable could go a long way

 


 

 

Superconducting HVDC cable:  a first

A short prototype of superconducting DC cable has opened new doors for long-distance HV power transmission. Consisting of a few meters of superconducting cable connected to a 200 kV class DC termination, it has successfully passed high-voltage tests. 
 
 

Low losses on one circuit

High energy transmission ratings are now possible with lower losses compared to conventional technologies. Also, a superconducting DC cable can transmit power capacity that would require much larger cables, multiple circuits of conventional cables, or overhead lines. 

 

Combines AC/DC expertise

We realized the opportunities HVDC superconductors offered for long-distance power transmission, especially since they could be buried, and are an alternative to overhead lines. Moreover, transmission losses at full load could be reduced by more than 50% compared to high-voltage AC or DC systems. So, we combined what we learned on conventional long-distance HVDC cables (like the one running between Scotland and Ireland) with our experience in the 138 kV AC superconductor system developed for the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA).  A completely new termination system, different from LIPA, was developed for the prototype.

 

Multiple uses

Network operators are interested in using HVDC links for short-distance links in metropolitan areas, for intercontinental transmission and for linking distant renewable resources like wind farms or Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants to high-load centers. Tests showed the system to be extremely robust, and easily adaptable to very high currents. The efficiency and environmental friendliness of DC superconductivity are likely to make intercontinental network integration a real possibility.